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J. Dwight Peterson International Fraternity Headquarters


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N42° 2.8631',
W087° 40.6307'

1714 Hinman Ave
Evanston, IL 60201
(847) 869-3655

The J. Dwight Peterson International Headquarters is owned by the Sigma Chi Foundation and is the location of the Fraternity and Foundation administrative and editorial operations, museum, library and staff offices.

It is open to members, pledge brothers, and their friends and families during regular business hours, or at other times by special arrangement with the staff. All of the important historical items of the Fraternity are on display in the museum, including the original Sigma Phi badge of Founder Daniel William Cooper and a replica of the Constantine Chapter badge fashioned by Harry St. John Dixon. The museum also includes a representation of the room in which the Fraternity was founded. The Fred Millis Library houses a sizable collection of publications written by or about Sigma Chis as well as numerous Fraternity-related works.

In the front yard of the Headquarters is a Freedom Tree, which is dedicated to the brothers who have served in the Armed Forces of the United States and Canada and in so doing have made the supreme sacrifice of losing their lives for the cause of freedom.

Visiting the J. Dwight Peterson International Headquarters

To arrange a visit, please call the receptionist at 847-869-3655 x200. A Google map, GPS coordinates, and the Headquarters' address have also been provided to aid you in your quest.

If you have questions concerning the J. Dwight Peterson International Headquarters, please contact The Sigma Chi Historical Initiative by using the "Ask the Archivist" category on the contact form on this website.

SIG HISTORY
SIG HISTORIANS

A NORTHERN CONFEDERATE AT JOHNSON'S ISLAND PRISON: The Civil War Diaries of James Parks Caldwell
George H. Jones
51st Grand Consul

McFarland & Co., 2010.


Sigma Chi Founder, Caldwell fought for the Confederacy and spent 18 months in the Union's Johnson's Island prison. While there he kept a diary on prison conditions, the politics of the day, and his personal interests.

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