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Joseph Cookman Nate Memorial Monument


Nate Monument Map

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N40° 28.181',
W088° 59.4613'

302 E Miller St
Bloomington, IL 61701-6727
(309) 827-6950

At the gravesite of Joseph Cookman Nate, the Fraternity, on behalf of numerous donors, erected a special monument in his honor.

Nate served the General Fraternity as Grand Consul, Grand Quaestor, Grand Tribune, Grand Historian and Grand Trustee.

Widely referred to as the Eighth Founder, Nate was a Grand Officer of the Fraternity for more than 40 years and wrote the monumental four-volume History of the Sigma Chi Fraternity.

At the time of his passing, Nate was serving as Grand Historian and Grand Tribune (then Visitation Officer), and knew hundreds of living Sigma Chis personally.

Initiated into the Alpha Iota Chapter at Illinois Wesleyan on March 14, 1885, Nate promptly became immersed in Sigma Chi affairs and remained so throughout his long and productive life.

Upon his college graduation in 1890 he was elected Grand Quaestor, only to find an empty treasury, large indebtedness, and small income. He faced the situation squarely, beginning to lay the foundation for a complete financial system at once. Before the end of his nine-year term he had the Fraternity's finances well in hand.

A devoted minister, he was a devout and truly dedicated Sigma Chi. He entered the Chapter Eternal July 30, 1933.

Visiting the Nate Memorial Monument

If you have questions concerning the Nate Memorial Monument, or you need information on visiting the site, please contact the site’s warden, Christopher D. Mizell at (309) 530-2779, or by using the contact form on this website.

A Google map, GPS coordinates, and the cemetery's address and phone number have also been provided to aid you in your quest.

SIG HISTORY
SIG HISTORIANS

A NORTHERN CONFEDERATE AT JOHNSON'S ISLAND PRISON: The Civil War Diaries of James Parks Caldwell
George H. Jones
51st Grand Consul

McFarland & Co., 2010.


Sigma Chi Founder, Caldwell fought for the Confederacy and spent 18 months in the Union's Johnson's Island prison. While there he kept a diary on prison conditions, the politics of the day, and his personal interests.

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